“Pretty Girl 13”—A Book Review

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Pretty Girl 13 by Liz Coley is a haunting tale, indeed.

Angie was taken at the age of 13 while on a Girl Scout camping trip. Three years later she finds herself walking home with no recollection of what happened. In her head, she’s still 13 and is just returning home from said camping trip.

Through therapy, it is discovered that in order to cope with her situation, Angie’s brain has created alternate personalities to individually deal with certain situations—her physiologist refers to them as “Alters.” The insane part is, Angie has no idea who these alternate personalities are or how to control them. Certain situations and triggers cause one of her Alters to take over. When this happens, Angie basically blacks out and loses periods of time, having no memory of what went on when an Alter “took the wheel.”

Through hypnosis, her therapist helps draw each Alter out in turn to hear their story, unraveling the mysteries in Angie’s past. The ultimate goal is figuring out how to essentially make Angie whole again.

This sounds stressful enough to deal with, but on top of the whole “Alter” fiasco, Angie must try to rebuild her life again—a difficult enough task for any kidnapped victim, but doubly so for a sixteen-year-old still stuck inside of a thirteen-year-old’s head.

Assimilating back into to school proves to be a special challenge, taking classes several years lower than her peers, and having any given Alter take control without warning, causing Angie to do things she wouldn’t normally do and can’t remember afterward. The actions of one particular Alter even causes Angie to become the target of school bullying. This poor girl cannot seem to catch a break.

But Angie is strong. She is a survivor. One step and one day at a time, she slowly but surely begins to take back control of her own life. Angie is a literary heroine to be admired and applauded. I give this valiant tale five stars!

*warning, some of the descriptions from her time in captivity are pretty graphic and a little hard to stomach.

 

“She noticed that she’s automatically used the past tense, like she was getting a sense of time—a then and a now. She didn’t feel thirteen anymore. She felt—undefined. “

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Delirium Trilogy – A Book Review

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 The Delirium Triology (Delirium, Pandemonium, and Requiem) by Lauren Oliver is an excellent dystopian tale fans of The Hunger Games and Matched trilogies are sure to love.

In the future, love is considered a disease, known as amor deliria nervosa. According to the new bible (The Book of Shhh), the “disease” affects your mind so that you cannot think clearly, or make rational decisions about your own well-being.

The solution to keeping America safe from this horrible disease, known as love: The Cure. When citizens turn eighteen, they have a procedure done that will remove their ability to fall in love. This procedure leaves a three-prong mark behind the ear, so that others will know you are cured.

The downside of the cure (though some consider it an upside): not only is your ability to love removed, but other strong emotions disappear as well. The Cureds basically float through life in a zombiefied state. People for the cure argue that the cure allows you to think rationally, eliminating the irrational and haphazard emotions that love brings to the table.

Quoted from a cured person:

“We are not the evil ones. We are reasonable and compassionate. We stand for fairness, structure, and organization.” –Requiem

However, the cure doesn’t always work for everyone. And there are also many people who are part of The Resistance: those who don’t believe in the cure, and want the freedom to choose love. Most of the Uncureds have fled to The Wilds—the areas of the world outside of society’s boarder fences— living like animals, scavenging for food and shelter; but they are free. These people are known as “Invalids.”

Some of the Invalids have rallied together and infiltrated the society, sporting fake procedural marks under their ears. These emissaries, collect information, make fake documents, and plant false information within the cured society, in hopes that The Resistance can take back the control of the world.

Lena’s father died when she was young and the procedure didn’t work on her mother—she went crazy from the deliria and threw herself off a cliff. Thus, since early childhood, Lena has been under the care of her very strict, rule-abiding, aunt. Lena cannot wait to be cured and is counting down the days until her procedure. She is afraid she will go crazy like her mother and wants, more than anything, to be normal.

Then she meets Alex.

Alex shows her his procedural mark under his ear, showing Lena that he is safe to be around: he has been cured. As Lena starts to hang out with Alex, she finds herself drawn to him. He doesn’t act like the other Cureds…he seems to still have that life spark that leaves most people once they have had the procedure. And Alex doesn’t seem to want Lena to get the cure, loving her fire:

“Everyone is asleep. They’ve been asleep for years. You seemed…awake.” Alex is whispering now. He closes his eyes, opens them again. “I’m tired of sleeping.” –Alex

The closer Lena gets to Alex, the more afraid she becomes that she is susceptible to the disease. But she can’t love Alex and he can’t love her, he’s been cured…or has he?

Lena must decide if falling in love is worth the risk: leaving the protection of an unfeeling society behind and fleeing to The Wilds so she can be with the boy she loves.

“I’d rather die on my own terms than live on theirs. I’d rather die loving Alex than live without him.”—Lena

This compelling series will have your heart sprinting as you cheer for this young couple’s future together, and having you yelling out loud at the absurdity of the society’s rules. While the writing is a bit slow and tedious, the overall story totally makes up for the lackluster prose. I give the series four out of five stars!

“Stupid Earl” –A Play by Sarah Hebert

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Here is a play I wrote for my first Drama class at LSU. Now, plays aren’t really my thing (I prefer books and movies), but this play got rave reviews from my peers. 

 

We had to pick a famous painting a create a play around it. I chose “American Gothic”, painted by Grant Wood. Here is what I came up with…enjoy 🙂

“The Casual Vacancy”—A Book Rant

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Just like millions of Harry Potter fans out there, I could not WAIT for J.K. Rowling’s new book, The Casual Vacancy. And let me tell you, I was totally not prepared for the complete and total letdown of this novel. Holy Balls, it was HORRIBLE!!!

 Absolutely NOTHING HAPPENS in this book! I swear there was no plot. It was merely 503 pages of boringness. And I did finish it, I swear…I kept hoping it would have a killer ending that would redeem the rest of the story, but NO, it didn’t. The ending was just as anticlimactic and lackluster as the rest of the tome.

Also, I feel like J.K. Rowling was on a mission to prove that she could do something other than “squeaky clean,” and went out of her way to use profanity and shocking sexual imagery. Some of the narrative descriptions in this volume had me crossing my legs…it was that crass and revolting. I get it J.K, you can use the “F Bomb.” Congratulations. But next time, let’s trying using it in a meaningful way to accentuate the plot and help the story to progress. Not just dropping it wherever, just because you can. (And this is coming from someone who cusses like a sailor.)

The supposed “plot” of this novel:

In the small English town of Pagford, Barry Fairweather dies unexpectedly, leaving a seat open on the town’s council. This happens at the very start of the tale. The rest of the book is about several different people and families in this small town and how this open seat on the council (and the town in general) affects their lives. This story literally follows about twenty different around and basically eavesdrops on their mundane lives. That’s it. The whole story.

Besides the fact that there are way too many characters to keep up with, everyone’s life is completely dull and uneventful. Not to mention the fact that pretty much every character was an utterly horrible person. I get it; I know that most people are not inherently “good,” and everyone has skeletons in their closet, but the way this story was written, I didn’t even remotely feel anything for these characters. They were all selfish and ignorant and I wanted to punch every single one of them in the face. And I’m not a violent person. I wanted to like this book, I really did, but WOW, such an epic fail.

In an interview with BBC, 26 September 2012, News Entertainment & Arts, Rowling says, “I don’t mean this in an arrogant way but I did not sit down to write this novel thinking “got to prove”. I had nothing to prove.”

To me, this basically translates to, I’m super rich and I can write whatever the f*ck I want, because I’m J.K. F*cking Rowling and people will buy my books. Period.

 

My advice…DO NOT READ THIS BOOK! I give it one out of five stars. And that’s being generous.

 

People

“A vivid read with great, memorable characters and a truly emotional payoff….Rowling captures the humanity in everyone.”

^ All I have to say about this review is, “False.”