“Nantucket Blue”—A Book Review

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Nantucket Blue by Leila Howland is the most absolute perfect beach read if you are looking for something a little thought provoking. Fans of Jenny Han’s The Summer I turned Pretty trilogy are sure to love this title.

Cricket Thompson is ready to have the summer of her life in Nantucket, staying with her best friend in the world, Jules. But right before the trip, Jules’ family suffers a tragedy and Cricket finds herself uninvited to stay with them.

But Cricket is determined—determined that Jules needs her this summer more than ever, and determined that this is the summer she will make her long-time crush, Jay, hers. Thus, Cricket gets a job as a maid at an inn on the island…not quite what she had in mind, but better than stuck at home all summer babysitting a snotty kid.

The thing is, life doesn’t always go how you planned it. Jules is dealing with her own sadness and decides not to be Cricket’s friend and is pissed that Cricket showed up in Nantucket.

“It didn’t matter how good my grades were or that I’d made varsity as a freshman; it didn’t matter how carefully, how perfectly, I’d managed my popularity; it didn’t matter that I’d measured an doled out my flirtations like teaspoons of sugar—never too much to be a tease, always enough to be sweet. Jules was able to take my happiness away from me with one swift betrayal. My social life had slid from good to bad like a hockey puck across a rink. It wasn’t fair. I wanted to take her to friend court.”

Now Cricket finds herself stuck on this island for the summer, scrubbing toilets and making beds, and without a best friend. While surrounded by rich hoity-toity islanders, Cricket must learn to lead her own life and stop wishing for things that are outside of her current grasp.

 “I was wishing I were that kind of rich, the kind where people have to respect you, because that’s what money does. It makes people shut up. It means you live in the big house, throw the cool birthday parties, belong to the country club that has its own jokes, its own dances; take awesome vacations, go skiing enough to get really good at it, own the best clothes, get the green dress.”

Ultimately, this is a summer for Cricket to find herself and to find love in the most unexpected place.

“The only opinion that should matter to me was that of the girl in the mirror. For the first time it felt true. It didn’t matter what other people thought of me; it mattered what I thought of me. I’m not sure why it was at that moment that it finally sank in, except that maybe this is how wisdom works sometimes. You hear it, and some extra-smart part of your brain that you don’t even realize you have grabs it. It stays there, hidden away, until it’s needed.”

This novel kept me turning pages from the very start. I simply couldn’t put it down. Five out of five stars for this brilliant debut!

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“Before You Go” –A Book Review

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Before You Go by James Preller, is a quick, but profound read. At 208 pages, I made it through this book in a few hours, but don’t let the size fool you about its might (pun not intended).

The summer before Jude’s senior year in high school, he takes a crappy summer job on the boardwalk flipping burgers. But anything is better than being stuck inside the house all day with an emotionally unavailable, pill-popping mother.

His little sister drowned in the backyard swimming pool seven years ago, when Jude was supposed to be watching her, and he has never been able to let go of the guilt. But the thing is, Jude was just a kid himself. Ever since that catastrophic summer, the only person Jude has ever really opened up to is his best friend, Corey.

When Becka starts working at the beachside concession stand with him, he is immediately enthralled by her. Because of how closed off Jude is, he keeps Becka at a safe distance, while somehow managing to pull her in at the same time. With the encouragement of his best friend and co-worker, Jude finally decides to go for it with Becka, and learning that they both play guitar and are passionate about the same music, it doesn’t take long for these two teens to hit it off.

But as it often does with life, just when things begin to look up, tragedy strikes again. As Jude struggles to stay afloat, he must decide if letting yourself love someone is worth the risk of a broken heart.

All in all I would have to give this book 3 ½ out of 5 stars. The narration was a bit weak at times, but I believe this book is worth the read. It doesn’t take long to finish, and the overall messages you take away will resonate within your heart. James Preller had me analyzing the important things in my life and asking myself, “Is it worth the risks?”

 

”Jude couldn’t locate the name for this feeling, the string of a child’s helium balloon slipping through his fingers, this sense of floating skyward, knew only a boy’s confusion and thrill and desire, the heart’s thrup and thrum. Kiss me again and again until all the stars crowd the sky like scattered salt on black rock. He pressed into her again, his heart on her lips.”